A bit of business advice from my point of view

25 Comments

  1. HackNpackShop
    Reply
  2. thisoldguy64

    nice video, so true!

    Reply
  3. ZeroG84

    As a photographer looking for a workspace this video was solid gold. Stuff
    is just cut-throat. Sadly not many people contacting you to do work for
    them understand the way that tools (in one profession or another) and
    rented space has to be payed. Everyone thinks they are the special-case
    that gets a special price. By the sound of this and your earlyer work here
    in youtube I get a feeling you’r a 100% great guy, and I’m a fan of that.
    Cars as a business get a bad rap for people that are less and do a crappy
    job. Wouldn’t mind you as a neighbour, even with the sundaynight compressor
    orchestra. :)

    Reply
  4. Paul E Clemons Jr

    You did a pretty good job explaining a self employed financial view and how
    things work but its hard for the working Joe to understand.They are used to
    a lump of money and is easier to budget when you know that lump is
    coming.Im familiar with both i currently have a small welding shop slash
    construction,farm equipment paint shop in Ohio.Im sure your familiar with
    the when it rains it pours,Its definetly a fly by the seat of your pants
    and alot of robbing Peter to pay Paul paying bills not customers.It is
    kinda of a patience tester when your trying to give some one a break and
    their still trying to break your balls on the price.Thats when i run them
    out of my shop.Because it never fails you can give those type a people a
    110% job and they will still bitch cause not the quality of your work but
    because their shelling out their money.I do know that I could not work for
    some one ever again as far as a 9 to 5.Been working on my own for 10 years
    and i like being in control even though sometimes it can get a little
    harry. Enjoy your videos learned quite a bit .thanks PAUL

    Reply
  5. doogals99

    Excellent advise. I have a totally different kind of business, but the
    same rules apply. Except, I do have loans and credit cards to fit in to
    that equation.

    Reply
  6. 1970chevelle396

    How I do it is Some jobs I have a set price for. All the other jobs are
    $75 an hour. Im in California. Im not sure if the rates are different in
    New York. All my customers think Im rich. Then I tell them Im broke
    because in the 6 years I’ve been doing this I’ve spent almost every dime
    I’ve made buying tools and Equipment.

    Reply
  7. paulsnyder23

    I usually do around 20-30% of what I make goes back into the shop. So if I
    do a $2500 job. $500-$750 goes back into the shop for materials. depending
    on what I use while doing that job

    Reply
  8. netrioter

    venture capital is a must…

    Reply
  9. 96ChevyDually6.5L

    Great advice !!

    Reply
  10. TheJohnaldChannel

    I wouldn’t give out your phone number, just satin’

    Reply
  11. TheJohnaldChannel

    Just sayin’, oops

    Reply
  12. jasonmushersee

    Question is how can a someone trust the bodyman? Did he charge for 1 gallon
    of base color or 1 pint? Did he charge for a salvaged body panel or just
    had one laying around? Did he charge for the glass company to install the
    windshield or put it in himself? I have a degree in autobody/collision
    repair and the shop i go to knows about me and they still screwed me when
    they painted the one side of my car without metallic and the other side has
    it factory!

    Reply
  13. CORVAIRWILD

    Can I bring Mrs CW’s Monza back now, and get it done rite??? And the SF Sub
    still gleams, and the Weasel is still a beaut! You’re a true Gem of a
    friend

    Reply
  14. netrioter

    i’d come help you if i was close for free or maybe throw in some grub or a
    few beers. The educational experience alone would be worth it. I bet you
    could score a local kid in high school in auto shop thats willing to do
    apprentice work…thats what i did in high school…worked for a man that
    taught me all the tricks on the trade for welding/metal fab and machining
    over a summer. I worked for free all summer…his wife would drop off
    dinner at the shop. When i stopped working for him when school started back
    up…he cut me a check for 3500 bucks and i wound up buying my first car
    with it… a 1967 Buick Skylark GS 340 for 1500 (1988 dollars)…then i
    gave the rest to my folks.

    Reply
  15. nitrosport5

    Great advice Shawn. I’m 22 and have all the paperwork in line to start a
    small engine repair shop out of the pole bld behind our house. If all goes
    well I’d like to upgrade to an actual shop. I don’t have a ton of overhead
    with the bld behind the house so it is great to get started. Keep up the
    good work

    Reply
  16. CornellsGarage

    I know what you’re saying about the mustang and F250, those kind of jobs
    can end up sitting, they get overwhelming because of the amount of work
    involved. My advice is to just set small goals and don’t look at the big
    picture, get a fender ready one day, get a door ready the next day, then a
    hood or whatever, just break it down into smaller jobs and before you know
    it, it will be done. Live and Learn, sucks learning the hard way but I know
    all about that too. Have a good one!

    Reply
  17. tbmproductionsdj1

    I own my own business. And I could tell you that does not matter what your
    business is, it is all the same. I’m a professional DJ. And work on
    weddings most of the time. But everything you said in the video whole truth
    in every person who owns a small business. Most of our customers do not
    think what we have to do to make a business run everyday. This is why I
    love watching your channel. You’re down to earth guy and you’re a real
    person. I’m going to share this video on my business Facebook page for
    others to see.

    Reply
  18. tomtomsolvic

    You have forgotten to mention to hold back money for taxes. They will get
    a chunk as always.

    Reply
  19. Alpha7 Investitures LLC

    I must agree with two things up front…(1) be honest in every aspect of
    business if you intend to stay in business and (2) be extremely
    diligent about assessing the true cost of doing business before you make
    that leap!!! I appreciate watching your channel as a part-time auto body
    guy (home garage thing for the bodywork, paint on an Air Force Base). I
    also do other things and would add one more thing for those who want to
    start a business (you talked about it a little indirectly)….DO NOT
    GUARANTEE MORE WORK THAN YOU CAN PHYSICALLY OR FINANCIALLY DELIVER. I know
    everyone wants to grow their business, but there’s a reason we have “small
    businesses” in this country predominately!!! Sorry for taking up so much
    space on your channel.

    Reply
  20. Adam Kniffin

    I figured it up and my shop has to clear 30 dollars every hour it’s open.
    That is the cost of our expenses. That is stupid low overhead, yet having
    just moved and established a real shop it is still tough to come by day in
    day out.

    Reply
  21. DECIPLESgarage

    Well put Boss. The reason I got into this was because I was tired of
    running around chasing construction work and trying to please homeowners.
    Doing work for a customer to me is the worst way about it. Why work for 18
    an hour and have to please a customer when i can go out and buy a 2500
    truck, spend 500 materials and a week labor, and flip for 5 grand and make
    50 an hour. That’s what i love about it. Making your own work. It’s like
    you determine how much you will make per hour when you pic and buy a
    flipper. 

    Reply
  22. OneEyeJay

    For the 2 vehicles just sitting there for a long time, Can’t you just
    allocate like 30 minutes once in a while to get them done? Just do a little
    at a time. Who knows, once you start the job/s you might not want to stop
    till it’s done.

    Reply
  23. Gram Pt

    Don’t beat yourself up Shawn, nobody has lessons on how to be a good son,
    husband, father, or whatever relationship. You are very realistic with
    your good advice. Maybe I think you are not charging enough for your work.
    I suspect that a cheaper price will put you under more pressure, and not
    make you enough to run on those side jobs. You maybe should charge more, if
    you get negative feeds on your pricing, you can offer a quick job, and a
    good job. Don’t run yourself into the ground, it’s not worth it. What are
    you worth? The jobs I have seen you do and how fast you do them, surely
    puts you in the top class of your trade. (Hey have you packed in smoking
    yet?
    All the very best,
    Gram

    Reply
  24. blazerlover25

    excellent advice in this video and really helpful because I am looking into
    starting my own business but the thought of additional expenses just makes
    me nervous but to say I am my own boss is the reward and no big
    corporations to tell me what to do..thanks for the video gonna be really
    helpful if I decide to take the leap into business ownership and I agree
    never get a loan because then all profit goes to the bank…again thanks
    for the advice much appreciated

    Reply
  25. rockymontana1

    Hey you do the best you can,help who you can,cut your losses if you have
    to,and remember you can’t take it with you.We just do our time here,and
    what you do depends on you and what kind of character you have.

    Reply

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